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Remove Execute Bits from Directories in the Current Directory  
 

Often there are times you need to change the permissions on a group of directories without affecting the files, the following command will stop others from executing the directories in the currently selected directory:

find . -type d -exec chmod o-x '{}' \;

The chmod command could be utilized in whatever fashion you'd like, for example chmod 777, or chmod ugo-w.

 
 
 
Remove Read Bits from Files in the Current Directory  
 

Often there are times you need to change the permissions on a group of files without affecting the directories, the following command will stop others from reading the files in the currently selected directory:

find . -type f -exec chmod o-r '{}' \;

Again, the chmod command could be utilised in whatever fashion you'd like, for example chmod 777 or chmod ugo-w.

 
 
 
Samba 3 Anonymous Public Shares  
 

Configuring anonymous public shares with Samba 3

On the file-server I run, I use samba to conveniently access my files. I like Samba. I can mount it on any machine I run and access my files like it’s any other file system, but when it comes to sharing files to other (anonymous) users, Samba has to cope with some ugly Windows legacy. After all, Samba is just an open source implementation of SMB/CIFS which Windows calls “Windows File Sharing”. Let’s look at the differences and how to cope with them.

 
 
 
Scan Local Network Computers Ports  
 

The package nmap is used by may system admins to determine the state of networks, the most common scan I use is a 'Stealth Scan', which is as follows:

nmap -sS -sR -sV -O -PI -PT 192.168.0.0/24

-sS/sT/sA/sW/sM : TCP SYN/Connect()/ACK/Window/Maimon scans

-sV : Probe open ports to determine service/version info

-O : Enable OS detection

-sR (RPC scan) : This method works in conjunction with the various port scan methods of Nmap. It takes all the TCP/UDP ports found open and floods them with SunRPC program NULL commands in an attempt to determine whether they are RPC ports, and if so, what program and version number they serve up. Thus you can effectively obtain the same info as rpcinfo -p even if the target’s portmapper is behind a firewall (or protected by TCP wrappers). Decoys do not currently work with RPC scan. This is automatically enabled as part of version scan (-sV) if you request that. As version detection includes this and is much more comprehensive, -sR is rarely needed.

 
 
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